BOOK SHAPED VESTA BOX WITH GALAITH CHAIN
BOOK SHAPED VESTA BOX WITH GALAITH CHAIN
BOOK SHAPED VESTA BOX WITH GALAITH CHAIN
BOOK SHAPED VESTA BOX WITH GALAITH CHAIN
FLEW DESIGNS

BOOK SHAPED VESTA BOX WITH GALAITH CHAIN

$439.00
OR MAKE 4 PAYMENTS OF $109.75 WITH AFTERPAY. MORE INFO
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A book-shaped vesta box with a stamp holding section at the back. Hung with a section of Galalith chain and other silver chains.

Galalith is a synthetic plastic material manufactured by the interaction of casein (the main protein present in milk) and formaldehyde. It could not be moulded once set but could be cut, drilled, embossed and dyed easily so its structure could be manipulated to create a range of effects. No other plastic at the time could compete in price, and with ivory, horn and bone products becoming far more expensive, it found a home in the fashion industry.

Galalith could produce gemstone imitations that looked strikingly real. In 1926, Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel published a picture of a short, simple black dress in Vogue. It was calf-length, straight, and decorated only by a few diagonal lines. Vogue called it "Chanel's Ford ", like the Model T, the little black dress was simple and accessible for women of all social classes. To accessorize the little black dress, Chanel revamped her designs, thus facilitating the breakthrough and mass popularity of costume jewellery. Galalith was used for striking Art Deco jewelry designs by artists such as Jacob Bengel and Auguste Bonaz, as well as for hair combs and accessories. By the 1930s, Galalith was also used for knitting needles, pens, umbrella handles, white piano keys (replacing natural ivory), and electrical goods. Production slowed as the restrictions of WWII led to a need for milk as a food, and due to new oil-derived wartime plastic developments, but still continues to be produced in small quantities, mainly for buttons.

Vesta boxes were produced extensively between 1890 - 1920. During this period, almost everyone carried Vesta ‘strike anywhere matches’, so they could light stoves, lanterns and other devices. Early matches were unreliable and prone to ignite from rubbing on one another or spontaneously, so most people carried a match safe (Vesta box) to house their matches. These were either held in a vest pocket or hung on a chatelaine.

Stamp cases first came about with the invention of the stamp in 1840, however, they initially faced limited popularity as one still had to go to a post office to post a letter. Following the introduction of post boxes in the 1870s, the popularity of stamp cases rose significantly as people kept their stamps at home. They enjoyed a relatively short period of production however and were largely superseded by stamp booklets and the like following the First World War.

Flew Design is the brand founded by local Melbourne-based jeweler and sculptor, Susie Lewis.