VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE
FLEW DESIGNS

VICTORIAN CALLING CARD NECKLACE

$439.00
OR MAKE 4 PAYMENTS OF $109.75 WITH AFTERPAY. MORE INFO
SILVER
Size *
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A Victorian-era calling card case hung on a sterling silver chain and leather.

The ritual of the calling card evolved in the early 19th century as part of a social system that was class-conscious and governed by strict rules of etiquette. The 'card and call' routine was the social media of the day, helping women to get together initially and to establish their compatibility without any implied commitment to a relationship - other than as an aspiration on the part of the caller. Cards were left during 'morning calls', directly after lunch. If the lady was out or did not want to receive the caller, the parlor-maid was instructed to say, 'Not at home'.

The important part of calling was how quickly the call was returned - the quicker the better, as it meant social acceptance. No return call was social death.

Secret codes were sometimes contained in the leaving or presentation of a card, e.g., if a lady was calling with her husband, she could signal so by turning down the top left corner of her card. Turning down the top right meant she was alone.

 The cards themselves were always white and tastefully engraved in crisply raised black copper late. This made them expensive, but no one could afford the stigma of cheap-looking cards.

Silver visiting card cases developed as a response to the ever-growing number of calling cards. Women’s card cases were larger than men’s, presumably because they were carried in handbags rather than in breast pockets, which were much tighter. Gentlemen’s cases were also much slimmer and plainer for this reason (raised decoration would catch on pocket linings) and were curved to fit into pockets.

The decoration on visiting card cases was fairly simple until the 1830s. Then, shaped cases became popular, which were heavily decorated with heavy silver die-stamped arabesques. As the century progressed, cases became simple once again. Many were decorated with bright-cut designs of flowers and foliage and would often feature a small cartouche for the initials of the owner.

Flew Designs is the brand founded by local Melbourne-based jeweler and sculptor, Susie Lewis.