Victorian Skirt Lifter
Victorian Skirt Lifter
Victorian Skirt Lifter
Victorian Skirt Lifter
FLEW DESIGNS

Victorian Skirt Lifter

$439.00
OR MAKE 4 PAYMENTS OF $109.75 WITH AFTERPAY. MORE INFO
SILVER
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A Victorian skirt lifter with silver and leather chain.

The way to manage a long skirt had been a problem for women for centuries. In the eighteenth century, small brushes were fitted to hems to keep dust away from the wearer's shoes, and aristocratic ladies paid a crossing sweeper a tip to sweep away garbage which lay in their path. But it wasn't until the nineteenth century that a practical solution became popular - the 'skirt lifter'.

In 1876 safety pins were patented, but they were not often used for fear of damaging fine or flimsy fabrics. Pinning the skirt also meant that the hem was permanently raised, something which was undesirable and risked exposing the ankles. 

The skirt-lifter, on the other hand, became immensely popular as soon as it was devised. They were made usually of brass, or silver-plated, and were attached to the belt, hanging at hem-level. Often shaped like tongs or scissors, the circular cushioned grip could then be attached to the edge of the skirt. There was a catch to lock the grips in place, and these were decorated in various ways. The wearer would then pull up the chain to lift the skirt clear of any dirt or mess. The cushioned or felted grips protected delicate fabrics from the grease of the hand or from dirty gloves which were often worn outdoors in this period.

As well as keeping skirts clear of dirt, ladies would also use them when riding, climbing stairs, dancing, or engaging in that newest of sports - bicycling.